Jump to content

zahzah

Members
  • Posts

    3
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

Contact Methods

  • Discord
    Zahmir#5801

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

zahzah's Achievements

Newbie

Newbie (1/14)

14

Reputation

  1. ORIGIN: 1965, Los Santos, the era of black oppression within the poverty stricken central streets consisted of many black communities who were under fire of racism, and unjust police brutality by the Los Santos Police Department. The low income housing projects, on the 83rd block was notorious for police appearance. With the black population rapidly spiking from 6.1 to 15.6 million, white Americans swiftly began migrating out, settling into suburban areas within the city, deserting the urban poverty while taking along many employment opportunities with them. This resulted in a lack of employment that the blacks needed. While sick and tired of being suppressed, is what would eventually lead to a black activist David King who would form the movement D.R.E.A.M. as a means for the black community to come as one, unite and stand together. It was not only a movement, but an organization which was inspired by the Black Panthers Party, yet another means to challenge the police brutality and inequality that African-Americans endured. As southern minorities rapidly faced what was a recession within the broken Roy Lowenstein area, the surrounding neighborhood and the housing projects, the black community congregated and started participating together in the equal rights movement in attempts for their voices to be heard. In 1969, social activist and civil rights leader "David King" was later assassinated while performing a social gathering in which both whites and blacks would have attended. The cause of death was later confirmed as a crime of hate, sparking the fire and enraging the black community further. The assassination of David King induced feelings of relentlessness, which only shortly after would cause a major civil disturbance within the streets and inner-cities, leading to dozens of other deaths predominately to blacks, and due to the pressure of the police at the time, the movement was short-lived and eventually disbanded. LEAD US INTO THE LIGHT: With the D.R.E.A.M movement disbanded and following the death of what was a social activist and civil rights leader, David King, hope was lost and there was hardly guidance within the black community. The sense of vulnerability, a lost youth, and with whites fleeting to the suburbs, the black residents faced income disparities making it near impossible for them and other southern minorities to seek for residency elsewhere. The police presence in these areas, most notoriously the 83rd block, would hassle the blacks, as they remained under employed, and weakened with poor defenses. The vision for a better life for African-Americans was anything but what they would have to look forward to now. With each passing day, what was left from the D.R.E.A.M. ashes emerged a group of four who decided to start their own movement - '83rd Street Dreamers'. With the movement rapidly gaining publicity within the black community, it wasn't too long before everything was in motion and they were in full swing. At the time, with conflicts and controversy that'd stem from one party to another, would quickly turn into fist fights, rooting into large scaled, all out brawls between the parties. It went as far as groups who rivaled one another, organizing fist fight brawls in specific locations, most notably the Innocence parkway public gardens, north-west of the blue, yellow and brown housing projects in Strawberry and 83rd. Gun crime at the time was hardly an issue and due to the culture and brutish nature the dreamers held, they participated just like the rest. With the disputes between parties becoming quote on quote 'solved' in this fashion, it was more or less viewed as a means for letting off steam and ridding of the pent up anger and frustration many black Americans experienced. As the dreamers continued to grow larger and increase in numbers, a reputation was soon built for the 83rd Street Dreamers, and so they capitalized by hosting neighborhood gatherings, barbeques, and parties which would have inadvertently resulted in less brawling and while although the fighting persisted within the neighborhood boulevard and with opposing parties, the 83rd Street Dreamers were now more or less viewed as party boys. COUNT US IN: It wasn't until the 1970's hit that resulted in what was a wide-spread epidemic only to later hit Los Santos in the 1980's. With the issues that the black community was already enduring from, it became a means for survival. It was what the white Americans had taken away and something that once seemed improbable for the southern minorities. Opportunity. It was out with the old and in with the new, and as profitable territory opened up in the urban areas, it was crack-cocaine that became the name of the game and the primary reason for skirmishes. Since the late 1960's, it's been a decade and 1 year since the dreamers had broken off and parted ways. The streets were more or less becoming modernized and retaliation was beginning to become personal. Homicides ranging from stabbings to shootings, most notably gun statistics and violence on a wide spread scale spiked up since the late 1960's. No longer was it about meet ups and all out brawls. Gun-play was the new M.O. and the few members left within the former 83rd Street Dreamers, took out "Dreamers", and rebranding into '83rd Streeters'. They didn't waste any time, and dove head first, hitting the streets hard while forgetting about the old beef for the sake and love of the money. Old rivals in the late 1960's also branded into their own cliques further contributing to the drug game or went completely extinct and off the radar. Once police started cracking down on the crack-epidemic it wasn't long until this all caught up with the 83rd Streeters, resulting in a large number of the affiliates either locked away behind bars in prison or 6 feet under. This landed them at a major disadvantage on the outside, as stronger groups spiraled out and began trying to overrun their territory. As the uncertainty grew between members, and without outside support, in order to keep the name alive they were forced to clique up with the 38' Gangster Crip. They were faced with very little options and while it had to be done, not everyone was willing to take up the flag. Less notable members stuck to their roots, keeping ties with the Black Guerilla Family on the inside while others completely broke away from the family as a whole. While there was never much animosity between the two, the old family ceased. With parole dates eventually becoming finalized for the incarcerated members of the 83rd Streeters, they were ready to take their new claim back out onto the streets. Higher up members within the 38' Gangster Crip had denied protection on the outside to the new band of affiliates, but sanctioned them to start their own set branched under the 'Gangster Crip' car. When the former dreamers hit the 83rd street in Los Santos in 1988, the word once again spread throughout the boulevard and surrounding neighborhood. It only took a few weeks for the set to become full swing, and with the decline of classic street brawls even the former members of the 83rd Streeters who once declined were willing to take on the new flag and step up. With the eventual increase in members, officially formed 83rd Gangster Crip. ORIGIN: 1965, Los Santos, the era of black oppression within the poverty stricken central streets consisted of many black communities who were under fire of racism, and unjust police brutality by the Los Santos Police Department. The low income housing projects, on the 83rd block was notorious for police appearance. With the black population rapidly spiking from 6.1 to 15.6 million, white Americans swiftly began migrating out, settling into suburban areas within the city, deserting the urban poverty while taking along many employment opportunities with them. This resulted in a lack of employment that the blacks needed. While sick and tired of being suppressed, is what would eventually lead to a black activist David King who would form the movement D.R.E.A.M. as a means for the black community to come as one, unite and stand together. It was not only a movement, but an organization which was inspired by the Black Panthers Party, yet another means to challenge the police brutality and inequality that African-Americans endured. As southern minorities rapidly faced what was a recession within the broken Roy Lowenstein area, the surrounding neighborhood and the housing projects, the black community congregated and started participating together in the equal rights movement in attempts for their voices to be heard. In 1969, social activist and civil rights leader "David King" was later assassinated while performing a social gathering in which both whites and blacks would have attended. The cause of death was later confirmed as a crime of hate, sparking the fire and enraging the black community further. The assassination of David King induced feelings of relentlessness, which only shortly after would cause a major civil disturbance within the streets and inner-cities, leading to dozens of other deaths predominately to blacks, and due to the pressure of the police at the time, the movement was short-lived and eventually disbanded. LEAD US INTO THE LIGHT: With the D.R.E.A.M movement disbanded and following the death of what was a social activist and civil rights leader, David King, hope was lost and there was hardly guidance within the black community. The sense of vulnerability, a lost youth, and with whites fleeting to the suburbs, the black residents faced income disparities making it near impossible for them and other southern minorities to seek for residency elsewhere. The police presence in these areas, most notoriously the 83rd block, would hassle the blacks, as they remained under employed, and weakened with poor defenses. The vision for a better life for African-Americans was anything but what they would have to look forward to now. With each passing day, what was left from the D.R.E.A.M. ashes emerged a group of four who decided to start their own movement - '83rd Street Dreamers'. With the movement rapidly gaining publicity within the black community, it wasn't too long before everything was in motion and they were in full swing. At the time, with conflicts and controversy that'd stem from one party to another, would quickly turn into fist fights, rooting into large scaled, all out brawls between the parties. It went as far as groups who rivaled one another, organizing fist fight brawls in specific locations, most notably the Innocence parkway public gardens, north-west of the blue, yellow and brown housing projects in Roy Lowenstein and 83rd. Gun crime at the time was hardly an issue and due to the culture and brutish nature the dreamers held, they participated just like the rest. With the disputes between parties becoming quote on quote 'solved' in this fashion, it was more or less viewed as a means for letting off steam and ridding of the pent up anger and frustration many black Americans experienced. As the dreamers continued to grow larger and increase in numbers, a reputation was soon built for the 83rd Street Dreamers, and so they capitalized by hosting neighborhood gatherings, barbeques, and parties which would have inadvertently resulted in less brawling and while although the fighting persisted within the neighborhood boulevard and with opposing parties, the 83rd Street Dreamers were now more or less viewed as party boys. COUNT US IN: It wasn't until the 1970's hit that resulted in what was a wide-spread epidemic only to later hit Los Santos in the 1980's. With the issues that the black community was already enduring from, it became a means for survival. It was what the white Americans had taken away and something that once seemed improbable for the southern minorities. Opportunity. It was out with the old and in with the new, and as profitable territory opened up in the urban areas, it was crack-cocaine that became the name of the game and the primary reason for skirmishes. Since the late 1960's, it's been a decade and 1 year since the dreamers had broken off and parted ways. The streets were more or less becoming modernized and retaliation was beginning to become personal. Homicides ranging from stabbings to shootings, most notably gun statistics and violence on a wide spread scale spiked up since the late 1960's. No longer was it about meet ups and all out brawls. Gun-play was the new M.O. and the few members left within the former 83rd Street Dreamers, took out "Dreamers", and rebranding into '83rd Streeters'. They didn't waste any time, and dove head first, hitting the streets hard while forgetting about the old beef for the sake and love of the money. Old rivals in the late 1960's also branded into their own cliques further contributing to the drug game or went completely extinct and off the radar. Once police started cracking down on the crack-epidemic it wasn't long until this all caught up with the 83rd Streeters, resulting in a large number of the affiliates either locked away behind bars in prison or 6 feet under. This landed them at a major disadvantage on the outside, as stronger groups spiraled out and began trying to overrun their territory. As the uncertainty grew between members, and without outside support, in order to keep the name alive they were forced to clique up with the 38' Gangster Crip. They were faced with very little options and while it had to be done, not everyone was willing to take up the flag. Less notable members stuck to their roots, keeping ties with the Black Guerilla Family on the inside while others completely broke away from the family as a whole. While there was never much animosity between the two, the old family ceased. With parole dates eventually becoming finalized for the incarcerated members of the 83rd Streeters, they were ready to take their new claim back out onto the streets. Higher up members within the 38' Gangster Crip had denied protection on the outside to the new band of affiliates, but sanctioned them to start their own set branched under the 'Gangster Crip' car. When the former dreamers hit the 83rd street in Los Santos in 1988, the word once again spread throughout the boulevard and surrounding neighborhood. It only took a few weeks for the set to become full swing, and with the decline of classic street brawls even the former members of the 83rd Streeters who once declined were willing to take on the new flag and step up. With the eventual increase in members, officially formed 83rd Gangster Crip. The 83 Gangster Crip (ETGC) had a rough starting period. In the late 80's and mid 90's, gang violence proliferated in Los Santos and to no surprise, they had their own role in the related statistics. As criminal activity continued to sky rocket, more gangs were being formed within the streets of Los Santos. In September of 1979, the 83 Gangster Crip recruited a new member; "Reginald Young". As the weeks pass by, on July of 1979 at 12:00 PM, Young walks out to the fifty cent store across the block on 83rd, when he stumbles across another young male who he would soon find himself in an altercation with. The two went back and forth shouting out insults to one another, when Young sends a right hook to the opposing male, Booker "Pooch" Cortez, knocking him on to the ground. Young proceeded to reach underneath his shirt, pulling a gun and firing twice, slaying the 15 year old. It was soon later discovered that the Booker Cortez was a gang member tied in with the Rollin 60's Neighborhood Crips. Once the Rollin 60's Neighborhood Crips discovered the news, they demanded the 83 Gangster Crips to hand over the recruit who was responsible for the slaying of Pooch, who was considered a solid member and an older brother to another member in the Rollin 60's. Only a few days pass as the 83rd Gangster Crip who shot the opposing crip member decided to turn himself in, handing himself over to the Los Santos Police Department. Because of this, 83rd was unable to find and capture him. The representatives for 83rd notified the Rollin 60's, informing them on the bad news which led to the Rollin 60's to believe 83 Gangster Crips were dishonest, as retaliation, shooting and killing 17 year old Darryl "Pookz" Audmend, a long time member of 83rd just days later. After the altercation between Cortez and Audmend, the two now rivals would appear to beef over just about everything. In July 12th of 1980, Maurice "MStackz" Demetrius, a deeply tied in member with the 83 Gangster Crips, was walking to the bus stop only moments later to be gunned down in the middle of the street, the assailants Rollin 60's. .380 ACP casings scattered on the ground as Maurice laid lifeless on the cement. From that point forward, it was only personal. There was no telling when and if the feud between the Rollin 60's and 83rd would ever die down. With times passing, the beef persisted. In 2003, the Los Santos Police Department unleashed a task-force crack down in the streets which both sides suffered from the harsh consequences. Members from both the 83rd Gangster Crips and the Rollin 60's were arrested and incarcerated, many which were notable members on both sides. Although this served as a huge hit to the 83rd Gangster Crips, it also allowed them to recuperate and get back on their feet as the feud slowly subsided directly with the passing years, as crime rate stagnated and came to an all time low for only a brief period. The feud between 83rd and 60's resulted in the first ever crip on crip gang violence in history. | MODERN TIMES: The 83 Gangster Crips aren't anything like how they used to be in the late 80's and mid-90's, although with that being said they are not to be overlooked and with the control over the housing projects in Strawberry and the surrounding neighboring blocks, they manage to run the area with an iron fist. This doesn't mean all is well for the 83 Gangster Crips though, and while the feud between the Rollin 60's has slightly died down, it remains on going to this day. OOC INFORMATION: This faction aims to represent the daily lives of residents in 83 Gangster Crip; both civilians and gang members. Our RP standards are high. Good English is essential, but is not prioritised over being able to create an interesting character and being able to contribute to the RP of the faction. We do not wish to jeopardise RP for the sake of using the correct vernacular in every scenario. Screenshot permissions are required to post on the thread, you can obtain these via our Discord server. Character Kill permissions are required upon joining the faction, the format can be seen below. Permissions are to be sent to zahzah or KP via forum PM only. Message me for the discord Invite.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and follow our Guidelines.